Fact Attack: Endangered Species No. 113 – The Asiatic Lion


Asiatic lion in Gir Forest via Pinterest

“Living wild species are like a library of books still unread. Our heedless destruction of them is akin to burning the library without ever having read its books”
John Dingell

Asiatic lionPossibly one of the most persecuted animals in history, this majestic and noble creature has suffered a shocking catalogue of violence and abuse over the past two millennia or more.

It has been used as a weapon, killed for sport and entertainment, stolen for zoo exhibits, graced the floors and trophy rooms of the unconcerned, been poisoned and electrocuted by villagers protecting their cattle, drowned in open-pit wells and is now, in the face of dwindling tiger numbers, being hunted for body parts for use in Chinese Traditional medicine and other applications.

Populations were first dramatically and critically depleted, and in some areas wiped out, in Roman times.  Had you lived as a Christian in ancient Rome, you might have wished this had happened a little sooner.  For Christians were often hunted as criminals for refusing to worship Roman Gods.  And indeed these, the Asiatic lions, were the lions the Christians and other prisoners were “fed to” and the ones gladiators faced in the arenas of the primitive coliseum games of the Roman Empire.

Wild Asiatic lion by Falguna ShahNot the lions choice, of course, they just happened to fit the task in hand.  And at the time they were as abundant as their human fodder.  But there is no doubt the animal’s lives ended very badly.

Killing them was a form of highly popular entertainment. They were starved in cages and then brought up into the arena where they would be baited, abused, stabbed and gored by gladiators, to the delight of the crowd. Sometimes, after they had been encouraged to kill a defenceless prisoner tied to a post.

“Hunts” would also be organised in the arenas with the lions having no way out and no cover.  Attack was their only defence and always ended in the gory and painful deaths of the overwhelmed, trapped lions.

Roman Circus, by K. KochRoman emperors staged these contests for personal popularity. Both animals and humans suffered a terrible fate.  Those who tormented and killed the weakened and frightened lions were hailed as heroes. Those themselves killed were soon discarded and replaced by others. The death toll was high on all sides.  But such deaths meant little to the sadistic Romans.  Their appetites were simply whetted further in their insatiable lust for blood and gore. 

These same callous and depraved Romans undoubtedly started the ball rolling where decimation of certain species are concerned, including the Asiatic lion, by the massacre of multiple species of starving, terrified animals for their own personal gratification.  At the inauguration of Titus, in 80AD, eight thousand animals were slaughtered within three days for his and the crowd’s amusement.

More of this centuries-lasting, unjustifiable slaughter can be found here, but do be prepared to be shocked at the scale of the annihilation and the range of animals concerned.  It is truly disquieting. 

The Christians Thrown to the Beasts by the Romans - Louis Felix LeullierIt is also particularly disturbing to realise a civilisation so advanced in so many ways could be so uncivilised and so deficient in others, including compassion.  The slaughter petered out eventually, after having continued for some four hundred years, but not because someone had developed a sense of fair play or a love of animals; simply because most of the animals were sadly gone and the power of the Roman Empire was declining.

But, by then the Romans had managed to eradicate the Asiatic lion from most parts of its original habitat.  And not just lions were involved in these barbarous activities. There were also elephant, crocodile, ostrich, bear, hippo, leopard, giraffe and rhinoceros, to name but a few of the species concerned.  In fact, anything they could capture by means fair or foul, they did, and with undisguised relish.  In short, the Romans wreaked complete havoc on the indigenous wildlife of Asia, Africa and the Mediterranean; lands which the Asiatic lion once roamed freely.  Some species disappeared altogether.

Asiatic lion showing his huge teeth An early pattern certainly seems to have formed here which, though many may now eschew such practices, great numbers have still not evolved from this mentality; indeed it seems firmly embedded in their psyche. Humans continue to be the lion’s only predator and the same blood-lust and cravings for degenerate fun have never been entirely stamped out.

Lion hunting for trophies and pleasure continued throughout the centuries, long after the Romans were gone.  Wealthy visitors and local tribesmen pursued them for sport. Some native peoples hunted them for meat and others killed them in defence of their own. In the nineteenth century, in India, the only country where they could still be found by this time, British colonial officers were bloated with pride when they were able to take home a lion skin to add to their trophy rooms. One hunter shot over three hundred lions.  

Something started by one empire running rough-shod over the world was finished by another doing the same, almost two thousand years later – so much for empires!

Young male in Gir Forest by Sumeet MogheFinally in 1900, following the devastation created by the British, which left the only remaining population confined to one area – the Gir Forest in the state of Gujarat – the lions were afforded legal protection.  At that point, this one isolated population consisted of about one hundred lions.

Hunting of lions is still forbidden in the Gir Forest and its surrounding areas, and although these particular lions are not subjected to profit-making hunts for tourists, there is still some evidence of recreational hunting.

And, inescapably, there are the highly organised gangs of poachers who, despite the endangered status of the lions, continue to profit from them.  Provided, naturally, with a huge incentive.  A new threat has arisen in the past few years. There exists an enormous trade in tiger body parts using virtually every bit of the animal.  As tiger populations have become more depleted and demand has risen, specifically from Hong Kong, South Korea and Taiwan, those who seek bones and other body parts for Traditional Chinese medicines have turned their attentions to lions, with the most at risk being the Asiatic lion.  The ever-growing demand for these medicines could potentially wipe out this species altogether.  A huge revival in the use of traditional medicines is currently occurring.  Demand is high and prices are soaring. Anything containing tiger parts is considered a status symbol. Ergo, anything containing lion parts seems destined to achieve the same repute.

Another young male in Gir Forest taking a breakIf the Chinese peoples, most notably, but not exclusively, the absurd nouveau riche (tuhao), do not develop some respect for wildlife soon, it will only be a matter of time before they have either eaten the planet clean or poached every last available tiger, lion, pangolin, elephant and rhinoceros.  All in the name of “traditional” medicine (using animal parts which serve no medicinal purpose whatsoever), in the pursuance of “must-have” items of adornment and by ritual slaughter for entertainment

As with ivory, the tuhao need to learn how to be more responsible and intelligent when using their new-found wealth.  Cites restrictions and rules are either not working here or not being applied, rendering them pointless at this juncture. Unless change is effected soon, there will be no wildlife left to protect and cherish.

One cannot help but see certain similarities here between the current rising Chinese Dynasties and the long gone Roman Empire.  Albeit the use of the animals differs.

Pride of Asiatic lions at one of the many open-pit wells in Gir Forest via National GeographicSince India’s human population in the area surrounding the Gir Forest recently reached over one billion, much conflict between the lions and the natives has arisen. The lions are also vulnerable to unpredicted events because of the nature of their population.  Added to which, open-wells across the area have resulted in deaths by drowning as the lions literally fall into the unguarded holes.  Crudely erected electric fences also play their part in the mortality rates.

An article written in the Scientific American suggests, quite rightly, the Asiatic lion has outgrown its space in the Gir National Park.  Relocation discussions began twenty years ago, and still continue as the parties involved scrap over “whose lions are they anyway!” and “will they be safe from the resident tigers in their new home”.  Court cases have been brought and plans made, but currently pleas are flying around and any final decisions hang in the balance.  After years of litigation it has become clear, the good people of the state of Gujarat are more than a little reluctant to let their lions go, despite the obvious necessity for greater habitat.

Asiatic lion - panthera leoAlthough smaller than African lions, the overall appearance of the male Asian lion is very similar.  The mane is one distinguishing feature.  The Asiatic male lion lacks the enormous half-body-covering mane of the African male lion. It’s mane is much shorter and less dense, leaving the ears visible. Other notable features are the fold of skin beneath the belly of the Asiatic lion and the longer tufts of hair on the elbows and the end of the tail.

This impressive apex predator can reach a length of eight feet, with a three-foot long tail and weighs over six hundred pounds. On top of this intimidating bulk, the Asiatic lion sports a set of very powerful and retractable claws and long, sharp canine teeth.

This is one very ferocious beast that hunts down its prey of deer, antelope and boar with consummate ease.  Running up to fifty mph, it pounces on its prey without missing a step.  In fact, it is capable of jumping up to thirty-six feet when needs must, so prey on the ground presents no problem.  Though despite these skills not every chase ends in a kill.

Lioness hunting by Tambako the JaguarThe females are the hunters in the pride whilst the males spend most of their day loafing around. They do, however, get first dibs at the meal and usually the largest share.  They are followed by the cubs.  The female, for all her hard work, is rewarded with the left-overs. Perhaps this is where the phrase “the lion’s share” comes from.  Altogether they are highly social beasts, living in small prides with females mostly hunting as a team, unless the prey is of manageable size for one lion alone.

Mating takes place all year round with males and females reaching maturity by the time they are five and four years old respectively.  A litter of one to four cubs are usually born after a gestation period of three and a half months.  Cubs are born blind and helpless, they weigh a mere two to four pounds and are fully dependant upon their mothers for the first few weeks of the lives.  They will suckle to the age Asiatic lioness with her cubsof six months but will start eating meat at the age of three months. Whilst male members of the pride will often guard carcasses preventing the lioness from feeding in order to allow the cubs to eat first, males taking over a pride will kill cubs under one year of age. Independence comes at one year.  By then the cubs should have their own hunting skills honed.

Sadly, there is an eighty per cent mortality rate in cubs and infanticide is the major cause.  This is followed by natural causes and occasional parental abandonment.

Those who survive infancy and current threats to the species should hopefully live to their full life expectancy of about twenty years.

A few extra thoughts…
Lions are the second largest of the big cats, after their closest relatives, the tigers.
The lion symbol is used as the national animal of many countries, including England. It has also been used for centuries in heraldic emblems on shields and coats-of-arms.
Though often commonly and mistakenly referred to as the “king of the jungle”, African lions live on grasslands, savannah and plains. As forest dwellers Asiatic lions are the only ones who come relatively close to this label.
Amazingly, the Asiatic lion’s heels don’t touch the ground when it walks and it can issue a roar which can be heard up to five miles away.
The Asiatic or Indian Lion is the only extant species of lion outside Africa.

Asiatic lion - Gir National Park Natural Habitat
Exposed grassy scrubland and dry deciduous forest.
Where
Gir Forest National Park, Western Gujarat, India and the surrounding area. 
What they eat
Primarily deer, antelope and wild boar.
Threats
Forests fires, poisoning, drowning in open-pit wells, inbreeding, disease, loss of habitat and prey,  and poaching.  These lions are now being targeted for Chinese Traditional medicines as tiger populations decrease.
Status: Endangered
The Asiatic Lion (Panthera leo ssp. persica) is listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as Endangered.  It is also listed in CITES Appendix I and it is fully protected in its native India.  A reintroduction programme, the Asiatic Lion Reintroduction Project initiated by the Indian government, serves to restore numbers of the species in the wild by way of reintroduction, increase water holes and end poaching, etc.  More details can be found here.  Little more than four hundred of the species exist in the wild. Although the population is now stable, poaching has increased putting numbers once more in jeopardy.  Various zoos across the world hold Asian lions and some participate in captive breeding programs.  A translocation programme to offer a larger prey base is in place, but this is currently being opposed by the Gujarat Government.

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Fact Attack: Endangered Species No. 112 – The Polar Bear


Mother and cubs, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada - Courtesy of Natural Habitat Adventures

“Global warming is no longer a philosophical threat, no longer a future threat, no longer a threat at all.  It’s our reality”
Bill McKibben

Polar bear 4Global warming – Is it really a myth or an absolute reality? Is it part of the natural climatic cycle or a panic situation created by scientists, climate experts, industrialists and meteorologists; aided and abetted by self-serving politicians?

This increasingly important issue has been debated for decades – with many conflicting opinions being aired globally, especially by those with a vested interest in delaying any action to address it.  But whichever camp you have a foot in, there is no doubt the Arctic ice cap IS receding, and if we don’t do something about it soon, we WILL lose the terrifyingly beautiful polar bears forever.  Sixty to one hundred years is the predicted time left for these spectacular animals, and the world will be a lesser place without them.

Unusually, the biggest threat to the species is not hunting by humans (although this is a danger which cannot be ignored);  it is their loss of habitat that will see them driven to extinction, and human activity is indisputably the primary cause. Currently, and misguidedly in my opinion, they are listed only as vulnerable by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.  These magnificent apex predators are in far deeper trouble than that.

Polar bear 12 As the ice continues to melt, there are many, ever-increasing threats to their survival, including land and water pollution, increased shipping traffic, oil and gas development, an increase in drowning and starvation, and, of course, the ubiquitous hunting parties.

Polar bears are completely dependent on the ice packs, where they hunt, breed and build their birthing dens.  But the expanses of water they now have to cover to get to them are getting far larger, and although the adult bears are accomplished swimmers, more than half of the cubs drown.  There is just too much open water. Some bears have been seen up to two hundred miles from land.  Indeed, in 2004, four adult polar bears drowned off the coast of Alaska when trying to reach the pack ice. 

Polar bear 15Mother bears are also reluctant to take young cubs into the water in the spring:  the cubs just don’t have enough fat on them to retain the heat levels needed for long periods in the water.

It conjures up a deeply sad vision of endearing little polar bears swimming after their mothers, struggling to keep up. Many destined to die of either hypothermia, hunger or exhaustion. Their adoring mothers suffering, too. Each one of them desperately trying to survive in one of the most hostile environments on the planet. 

And even more anguish and hardship appears to be coming their way.  Having just marked the 25th anniversary of the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill (by no means the worst in history),  Big Oil remains unrepentant.  Notwithstanding oil still clinging to the boulders on the beaches in the Gulf of Alaska, further plans to develop offshore oil and gas in the Arctic are still being seriously considered.  As more ice melts, more potential sites are created for exploration and drilling.  Ergo, less ice means more scope.  This particular effect of global warming has not gone unnoticed by the industrial mega-giants. 

Exxon Valdez Oil SpillHowever, current research indicates even the smallest oil spill now has the potential to destroy the entire ecosystem. And how do you clean up an oil spill in floating, fragmented ice? Or any ice at all, for that matter! No-one, it seems, has yet found an effective way.

The reality is; the polar bears will die, along with the seals (their prey species), many whales and countless birds, and untold numbers of fish eggs will again be destroyed.  In fact, virtually all marine life in the area will be either affected or obliterated as well as those who feed on them.  The best estimates for casualties of the Exxon Valdez spill were: 250,000 sea-birds, 2,800 sea otters, 300 harbour seals, 250 bald eagles, up to 22 killer whales, and billions of salmon and herring eggs.

In short, another oil spill, or pipeline leak, would spell complete disaster for the polar bears and other wildlife.  Now is the time to close down all fossil fuel exploration in Arctic waters.  If not, it WILL be too late to save this extremely vulnerable, rapidly declining species.

Polar bear 8In order to survive extreme conditions, polar bears must regulate their own body temperature.  An oil-drenched coat would prevent this.  Their prey species will most certainly end up covered in oil, which the bears may well ingest, making them vulnerable to any contaminants, as would personal grooming.  Kidney failure and brain damage are among some of the possible after effects.  For those which haven’t already starved to death, an oil spill would most certainly take them down the same road.

Observations suggest pregnant polar bears do not react well to disturbance – something they are quite sensitive to.  Any disturbance of den sites during exploration could cause the mother to abandon the den and/or her cubs, leaving them to die of hypothermia or starvation.  With such a low population growth rate, the polar bears may never recover from these threats.

Polar bear hunting via the IndependentAnd, of course, there are many other threats, a list of which would not be considered complete without the omnipresent hunters.  Decades ago, polar bears were hunted vigorously for their pelts, paws, teeth, meat and fat.  Such hunting was largely unreported, often illegal and highly unsustainable.  This supposedly ended in 1973 when Canada, Denmark, Norway, the then USSR, and the United States of America signed an international agreement, known as the Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears .

Since then, however, four of these countries, Canada more than most (a country which so barbarically still allows the slaughter of baby seals and boasts “Canada is a proven world leader in the management, research, monitoring and conservation of polar bears”), have continued to host polar bear hunts. 

Inuit hunters via te Economist“Today”, according to Polar Bears International:  “Legal hunting in Canada continues on a limited, regulated basis for native peoples”.

Really!  Perhaps someone should pass this on to the Canadian government, who are currently charging fees for hunting and trophy licences to non-natives, to which they are adding seven per cent tax.  Export licences are also issued.   The native peoples are now cashing in on this killing spree, over and above subsistence level, and a great many non-native hunters have leapt at the opportunity.   In defiance of declining numbers, these polar bear hunts in Canada are regularly advertised for all who care to, and can afford to, kill them for fun.

Polar bear Polar Bear Hunting, one of the many profit-making businesses involved in killing polar bears, tells us,  “The actual hunt must be done in the traditional manner with an Inuvialuit Native guide and dog team”.   In my unwavering opinion, the “actual hunt” should not take place at all, but since we are travelling that route, let’s not forget the “traditional” high-powered rifles and crossbows used, without fail, on every single hunt.  Shameful!  Quite frankly, it’s hard to imagine the callous mentality of those who consider curtailing the one-and-only-lifetime of an animal to be a once-in-a-lifetime thrill for themselves.  Nevertheless they do and they need to be stopped.  This is very far removed from the native peoples’ original subsistence hunting.  This is hunting solely for pleasure and profit.

Polar bear standing on the iceWith reference to Alan Parker’s superb article – How Coke Can Save 100 Polar Bears Every Year,  “Of the five countries who signed the (Polar Bear) agreement, Canada is the only one that still allows the hunting of polar bears by anyone other than native peoples.  As such, trophy hunters from around the world flock to Canada, paying about $35,000 each (not including commercial or charter air fare) for the chance to kill a polar bear”. 

Polar bear pelts, it seems, are fetching up to twelve thousand dollars at auction in Canada, so temptation is high.  Unsurprisingly, buyers are mainly from China and the Russian Federation.

As a result, hundreds of polar bears are being killed every year where populations have been listed as either declining or data deficient.  Each sub-population has its own kill quota, and although, to reiterate, it should not be happening at all, there is no guarantee even this is being adhered to.  Norway is the only country that protects polar bears from all forms of hunting.

Polar bear 16And let’s face it, if you are tracking a polar bear, it’s a pretty big target to miss when you find it.  Male bears can weigh anything between seven hundred and twelve hundred pounds.  And, at almost nine feet tall and ten feet in length, it doesn’t take an expert marksman to fell the poor bears. In fact, polar bears are the largest of all living bears, next to the Kodiak Bear.  It seems to be debatable which bear is actually the bigger one.

Curiously, polar bears have black skin covered with thick, hollow, colourless guard hairs.  The hairs reflect the light giving the appearance of a white coat.  The bears moult in the spring, and, having devoured many seals over the winter period, their coats will have taken on a yellowish appearance.  This will be restored to the more familiar “white look” by the summer months. Polar bear 11 With this dense, water-repellent fur and their heat-retaining, four-and-a-half inch layer of fat, they can withstand extreme temperatures on land and in water.  They are also equipped with rough, anti-slip pads on their enormous paws to help them when travelling on ice.  The same huge, powerful paws act as paddles in the water.

Polar bears have always been carnivores.  Until recently that is. Ecologists, most pointedly Linda J. Gormezano of the American Museum of Natural History, have observed them changing their diet and hunting techniques to include other land-based foods.  Bird eggs and caribou seem to be their favourites.  The bears have been seen appearing during the breeding season, strolling nonchalantly up to the A lone polar bear targeting thick-billed murres and their eggsnests and helping themselves.  Other, more determined bears, have scaled cliffs to access the eggs.  Some have even been observed eating grasses and berries. 

Many more sightings on land have been reported in recent times and bears have often been known to approach human settlements.  One theory being an increase in population, with the bears merely spreading out.  The more realistic reason is the ice is melting and quite naturally bringing them closer to human-occupied land where they are now spending more time.  More polar bears on land does not indicate a population increase, more a sign of altered migration habits as the bears, facing starvation, are forced ashore through lack of ice and prey.

Polar bears are solitary creatures and tend to team up only during mating and cub rearing.  There is a gestation period of about eight months, after which the female Polar bear 7will give birth to up to four cubs – twins being the most common – each weighing about one pound and reaching a mere twelve to fourteen inches in length.  Babies are usually born in dens on snow-covered land between November and January and emerge in the spring.  It is essential the mother eats plenty of food in the summer in order to build up sufficient fat before entering the den as she will have to live off the reserves.

With polar bears maturing late, usually at four to five years, litters not being particularly large, and the first two to three years after birth being invested in parental care, the bears are unable to produce more than five litters in their lifetimes.  This, of course, means a very low reproductive rate for the species. Cubs successfully surviving the current threats could live up to twenty-five years.

Polar bear A few extra thoughts…
Polar bears are known by various other names – a lot of other names! Nanuk, Lord of the Arctic, Ice Bear, Isbjorn and Tornassuk are just a few.
The scientific name for the polar bear, Ursus maritimus, means “sea bear.”
Although primarily land dwellers, polar bears are considered marine rather than land mammals.
As fissipeds, paw or pad-footed mammals, they belong with sea otters in the Order Carnivora. Others in the family include seals and walruses.
Unlike many other bears, polar bears do not hibernate. Only pregnant females enter dens during winter.

Polar bear distribution- Map courtesy of National Geographic

Natural Habitat
The Arctic ice regions surrounding the North Pole.
Where
Canada, Alaska, Greenland, Norway and the Russian Federation.
What they eat
Seals, primarily the ringed seal, and the odd walrus or beluga whale.  They are also known to feed on the carcasses of the bowhead whale.  Research indicates polar bears are now starting to adapt to a more land-based diet as the ice continues to melt.
Threats
Climate change.  Oil and gas development and oil spills, increased shipping traffic, pollution, drowning, over-harvesting for meat and skins by locals, and hunting for sport by other parties.
Status: Vulnerable
The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as Vulnerable (at high risk of endangerment in the wild).  It is also listed on CITES Appendix II.  Polar bears are protected in the United States under the Marine Mammal Protection Act and listed under Section 4(d) of the Endangered Species Act as Threatened wherever found.  There are an estimated twenty to twenty-five thousand polar bears left in the wild.  These are split into nineteen reported sub-populations, the largest being in Canada.  There are various captive breeding programmes currently in action and polar bears can be found in zoos across the world.  Many agencies and individuals are working globally to reduce the current environmental issues which impact on the bears.

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Wildlife recovery in Namibia


Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:

This video says about itself:

Pride of Namibia

1 March 2014

Namibia is home to the greatest wildlife recovery story ever told. Since its birth just over 2 decades ago, the country of Namibia has shown the world how to ensure Africa’s natural legacy while expanding livelihoods.

“Pride of Namibia” tells the story of communities committed to protecting wildlife, of a nation that has enshrined conservation into its constitution, and of the future of responsible travel – tourism that directly benefits the people who give wildlife freedom to roam.

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Fact Attack: Endangered Species No. 111 – Dorcas Gazelle


 

Dorcas gazelle in the desert

“We cannot have peace among men whose hearts delight in killing any living creature. By every act that glorifies or even tolerates such moronic delight in killing we set back the progress of humanity”
Rachel Carson

Dorcas gazelle The small and graceful Dorcas gazelle continuously falls prey to what is left of the indigenous four-legged occupants of North Africa and the Middle East. Natural hunters such as lion, caracal, Arabian wolves, cheetah and leopard. But, the efforts of all these predators combined are no match for humans and the havoc they have wreaked upon the species. Little surprise to most, of course, since this seems to be the prevailing cause of decline in ninety-eight per cent of all wildlife today.

Although the Dorcas gazelle has long been, and still is, subjected to traditional hunting for meat, hides and horns, the killers have now upped the ante.

Current, uncontrolled pursuance of the species in high-performance, four-wheel-drive vehicles, carrying trigger-happy assassins armed with powerful modern weaponry, is something which patently needs to be addressed by the hosting countries. Who, shamefully in some cases, issue permits for this barbaric enterprise.

Hunting Dorcas gazelle in LibyaIn most parts of its range, however, hunting the gazelle is deemed illegal, but it continues regardless and a blind eye is often turned by the authorities. And, just as often, groups of militia are among the bands of slayers.

For those who see killing as an enjoyable past-time, the opportunity is but a phone call and a credit card away. There are plenty of blood-thirsty safaris, for the right price, where you will find everything laid on for you, right down to the freely available permits which can be bought at the airport upon landing.

Horrendous mental images leap to mind of ruthless, like-minded men and women standing up in the back of open-topped, fast-moving, specially adapted motor vehicles. Their weapons (often automatic) loaded and ready to discharge as they rapidly gain on the animals, preparing to pick them off at will. The faces of the executioners aglow with anticipation – rather like those of innocent children waking up on Christmas morning. But the outcome here is far more sinister.

Dorcas gazelle runningDorcas gazelle can travel up to sixty mph when threatened, and like all other gazelle, speed is this gentle ungulate’s only asset when defending itself. But in this case, the advantage of being fleet of foot is lost to the superior vehicles and their cold-blooded hunting parties. Within a short time whole herds are found, overtaken and massacred – the unfortunate victims of large scale slaughter for the entertainment of the few, in their eternal quest for amusement.

Atop of that, the gazelle’s habitat is rapidly shrinking in the face of human invasion. In recent times, the development of wells and boreholes has seen an influx of humanity pouring into the desert, along with their livestock. 

Dorcas gazelle herdThat the clean water supplies have saved lives, there is no doubt. Both human and non-human animals have benefited greatly. But now, converted to farmland; cattle, goats and sheep graze the arid landscape where abundant Dorcas gazelle once roamed freely, slowly squeezing it out of its habitat.

These activities have all influenced the decline of the Dorcas gazelle and have led to these delightful, placid creatures becoming extinct in several parts of Africa. Now is perhaps the time to ensure no further vulnerable populations are lost to human greed, callousness and oversight. The irony being, they are now marginally safer from their natural predators as most of them, too, have been aggressively hunted down and killed for meat, hides, body parts and recreation.

Dorcas gazelle Al Wabra Wildlife PreservationThese diminutive, perfectly assembled creatures are little more than two feet in height and weigh, at most, forty-five pounds. They sport ringed horns which curl backwards and inwards, and grow up to fifteen inches in length. The female horns tend to be thinner, paler and not quite as curved.

Their coats are a palish sandy colour on top with a deeper colouring of two differing brown strips along the edge of the underside where the coat becomes white. Heads are darker than bodies with well-defined facial markings. They have short, almost black tails used constantly for flicking away insects in the intense heat of the desert.

And, they absolutely thrive in the desert. They are able to withstand extreme temperatures in their far from hospitable, parched environment, and manage to derive all the moisture they need from the plants they consume. But survival is not just about food and water. The Dorcas gazelle still has a few natural predators left, like the caracal and hyena, and the Arabian wolf, and perfect eyesight allows them to efficiently watch out for such dangers and call to each other when anything fearful is spotted. “Stotting” takes place, which involves taking bouncing leaps with heads held high, along with shivering and tail twitching, which are all are used to warn the rest of the herd when something is amiss.

Dorcas gazelle - newborn hiding in the shadeAt such times, calves are kept well-hidden from potential harm. Newborns, arriving after a gestation period of six months, are usually well-developed and able to stand within the first hour, but not able to defend themselves or run with the herd, so a secure hiding place is a must. The females, having separated from the group to give birth to the new calf, will stash the little one in the bushes or long grass for the first few weeks of its life, which also leaves her free to graze. The calf will be strong enough at two weeks to follow its mother in short bouts, and by three months it will be fully weaned. Those who survive the rigours of life in the wild can expect to live for a further twelve years.

A few extra thoughts…
The Dorcas gazelle, along with a few other ungulates, is extremely important as a seed disperser for a variety of Acacia plants in the areas between Israel and the Red Sea.
The Dorcas gazelle once roamed the entire Sahelo-Saharan region in great numbers.
The species is now extinct in Senegal, possibly Nigeria and, it is thought, Burkina Faso as well.
Dorcas is the Greek translation of the Aramaic name Tabitha, meaning “gazelle”.

Dorcas gazelle are also known as the Ariel gazelle.

Dorcas gazelle distribution Natural Habitat
Savannah, low hilly outcrops, semi-desert, absolute desert, steppe and wadis (dry gullies).
Where
North and North East Africa and parts of the Middle East (Israel, Jordan, Syrian Arab Republic and the Yemen)
What they eat
Leaves, grasses, flowers, young shoots, fruits and acacia pods.
Threats
Excessive recreational hunting with powerful modern weaponry.  Habitat degradation due to land conversion and overgrazing by livestock, and drought.
Status: Vulnerable
The Dorcas gazelle (Gazella dorcas) is listed on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as Vulnerable (at high risk of endangerment in the wild). It is also listed in CITES Appendix III (Algeria, Tunisia) and included in the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS) Sahelo-Saharan Antelopes Action plan for the conservation and restoration of the species, on CMS Appendix I.
All told, the species is either legally or partially protected in most if its range countries. Some of these include designated reserves. Unfortunately, these laws are often ignored. Captive breeding programmes also exist.
There are only some 35,000 – 40,000 Dorcas gazelle living in fragmented populations in the wild today, whose numbers are declining rapidly. Further animals can be found in zoos and private collections around the world.

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Crimes of Humans and Nature

Earth Hour – 29 March 2014


 

Today, Saturday 29th March 2014, billions of people in over one hundred and fifty countries (that means over seven thousand cities) will turn out the lights. A World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) initiative, dating back to 2007, has once again united the world in an effort to bring attention to energy consumption, sustainability and climate change issues.

This remarkable annual global occurrence takes place between 8.30 pm and 9.30 pm (YOUR) local time.  Starting in New Zealand and ending in Tahiti, lights of some of the world’s most iconic monuments, landmarks and skylines will be switched off. Many will also turn off their televisions, computers, Xboxes and PlayStations, and any other power-driven gadgets they have.  

This is undoubtedly the largest ever collaboration to help safeguard the planet, and numbers of participants are growing every year. The hour has, in many places, evolved into something much longer. Environmental projects are taking place, such as tree-planting and litter clearance. Stargazing without the hindrance of bright city lights has become very popular. Candle-lit activities have been arranged, parties are being thrown and acoustic concerts given. In fact, masses of entertaining activities are going on around the globe – and all without the use of power. 

Will you be turning your lights out?

There are some fabulous interactive images here from Earth Hour 2013, where, from image 2, you can click on each image and see the lights fade out.

And a few still shots of some of the places where the lights have been turned off in past years.

Sydney Harbour Bridge and S...

Sydney Harbour Bridge and Sydney Opera House, Australia

Makati, The Philippines

Makati, The Philippines

The Colosseum, Rome, Italy

The Colosseum, Rome, Italy

Kiev - Earth Hour 2013

Kiev, Ukraine

Hong Kong - Earth Hour 2013

Hong Kong

Earth Hour in Islamabad, Pakistan

Islamabad, Pakistan

The Empire State building

The Empire State building, New York

Vienna's City Hall - Earth Hour

Vienna’s City Hall, Austria

Houses of Parliament, London - Earth Hour

Houses of Parliament, London

Cairo - Earth Hour

Cairo, Egypt

Lights out in South Africa

Lights out in South Africa

Earth Hour by Jeremiah Armstrong WWF-Canada.

Earth Hour by Jeremiah Armstrong WWF – Canada

Killing Healthy Zoo Animals Is Wrong—And the Public Agrees


Mungai and the Goa Constrictor:

As usual, Exposing the Big Game has hit the mark with this article. The only thing these poor animals are being conserved for is profit. This appalling, needless slaughter has to stop. The behaviour of all those involved in this multi-billion dollar industry is not acceptable on any level. They seem to have completely redefined the word “conservation” to meet their own ends and the public will not be conned by them any more. They have been exposed and It’s time they realised this.

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140327-copenhagen-zoo-giraffes-lions-animals-deaths-science-world/

Scientist calls lion, giraffe deaths “zoothanasia”—or heartless elimination.

A photo of two lionesses at the Copenhagen Zoo.

Two lionesses are seen at the Copenhagen Zoo on March 26, not long after four other lions were put to death.

PHOTOGRAPH BY JENS DRESLING, POLFOTO/AP

Marc Bekoff

for National Geographic

Published March 27, 2014

The four lions killed by the Copenhagen Zoo this week, as well as  the healthy young giraffe named Marius put to death in February, didn’t have to die.

A global uproar has followed the deaths of two African lions and their two ten-month-old cubs. Their lives ended because the zoo wants to introduce a new male to the remaining females to bear more lions.

The same outcry was heard when a healthy young giraffe named Marius, who had the wrong genes for the facility’s breeding program, was killed with a bolt to his head—so as not to contaminate his body with poisons. The giraffe…

View original 699 more words

China’s Rich And Powerful Show Off Their Social Status By Attending Ritual Tiger Killings


Mungai and the Goa Constrictor:

The (very sick) rich and powerful in China need to be deprived of their riches and power, post-haste.

Originally posted on spiritandanimal.wordpress.com:

China’s Rich And Powerful Show Off Their Social Status By Attending Ritual Tiger Killings

tigerkill

REUTERS/China Daily

A dead tiger is found during a police action in Wenzhou, Zhejiang province, January 8, 2014.

More than 10 tigers have been killed as “visual feasts” to entertain officials and rich businessmen in a Chinese city, state media reported.

Police in Zhanjiang in the southern province of Guangdong seized a freshly slaughtered tiger and multiple tiger products in a raid this month, said the Nanfang Daily, the mouthpiece of the provincial Communist Party.

Local officials and successful businesspeople gathered to watch the tigers being killed as “eye-openers” to show off their social stature, it said.

Video footage of a killing two years ago showed the tiger, kept in an iron cage, having an electrified iron mass prodded into its mouth with a wooden…

View original 19 more words

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